Trail Mix Cookies

These vegan Trail Mix Cookies include chocolate chips, nuts, seeds, raisins, and more all baked into each and every deliciously tender cookie. This recipe delivers cookies perfect for the trail, with just enough sweet, and just enough goodness to keep you going for miles!

A hand holds a trail mix cookie with a bite taken out, showing lots of melty chocolate chips. It's hovering over a stack of cookies and there are more cookies in the background.

I love a good hike and a good chocolate chip cookie to go along with it. I especially love cookies that are infused with oats and trail mix. It’s one reason these trail cookies are the best!

Why This Recipe is a Winner

  • Toasting oats enhances their naturally delicious nutty flavor
  • Chilling the dough right before baking creates perfectly soft and chewy cookies
  • Adding molasses is a great way to make these cookies stay soft for days
  • Pressing extra toppings into the cookie dough balls before baking gives a bakery shop cookie look!

What You Need

You can find the full printable recipe, including ingredient quantities, below. But first, here are some explanations of ingredients and steps to help you make this recipe perfect every time.

Here are the ingredients you’ll need for this recipe:

  • Sugar — You’ll need granulated sugar and brown sugar (light, dark, or homemade brown sugar).
  • Vegan butter — I recommend Earth Balance Buttery Sticks, Miyokos, or you can make homemade vegan butter.
  • Flax egg — We’ll use two flax eggs, or you can substitute chia eggs.
  • Vanilla extract — I like the mild flavor vanilla adds, but this is an optional ingredient if you don’t have it available.
  • Oats — These cookies are best with old-fashioned oats, otherwise referred to as rolled oats.
  • Flour — Use all-purpose flour, whole wheat pastry flour, or 1:1 gluten-free baking flour.
  • Cinnamon — You’ll need a teaspoon of ground cinnamon, or you can substitute pumpkin pie spice.
  • Molasses — You’ll need just one tablespoon of molasses found in the baking aisle of most grocery stores.
  • Baking soda + Baking Powder — Make sure your baking soda and powder are fresh. You can do this by testing a bit of it (baking soda in vinegar and baking powder in hot water). If it bubbles, then your batch is good to go.
  • Salt — Plain table salt does the trick, but you can substitute sea salt.
  • Trail Mix — I used Power Up Omega Trail Mix (another one of my favorite vegan products at Costco). You can substitute your favorite dairy-free trail mix.
  • Chocolate Chips — Use this Dairy-Free Chocolate Chips Guide to choose your favorite chocolate chips.

Ingredient Spotlight

A jar of molasses is pouring into a small white bowl

What Molasses is Best?

Sulfur dioxide used to be added to molasses as a preservative and clarifier, but it can cause allergic reactions, so most molasses is now unsulfured. Most of the time you’ll want to use fancy or light molasses (referred to as treacle in the UK) rather than blackstrap, which has a bitter flavor and is not preferred for baking.

How to Make Trail Mix Cookies

  1. Toast the oats for 10 minutes. Then set them aside to cool.
  2. Cream the butter and sugar in a mixing bowl until smooth and creamy.
  3. Stir in the flax egg and vanilla.
  4. Mix the dry ingredients and add them to the mixing bowl.
  5. Use your mixer to beat the flour ingredients, followed by the oats.
    Looking down on a mixing bowl full of cookie dough batter and oats.
  6. Stir in the trail mix and chocolate chips.
  7. Cover the dough and chill it in the fridge for 10 to 15 minutes.
  8. Drop dough by rounded spoonfuls onto a cookie sheet and bake for 9 to 10 minutes.
    Cookie Dough ready to be baked into the Best Chocolate Chip cookies!
  9. Let the cookies cool for a minute on the baking sheet before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.
Looking down on a plate full of trail mix cookies.

Storage Tips

Store cookies in an airtight container at room temperature for up to 5 days or in the fridge for up to 10 days. You can freeze these cookies in an appropriate freezer-safe container or bag for up to 2 months.

Marly’s Tips

  • Want more make-ahead ideas for cookies? Here are my favorite tips for freezing cookie dough.
  • Make peanut butter trail mix cookies by substituting ½ of the vegan butter with peanut butter. I prefer using the smooth homogenized peanut butter (not the kind that has to be stirred) for cookies.

More Oatmeal Cookies

If you love these oatmeal trail mix cookies, here are even more sweet bites infused with oats. Be sure to give these a try:

I hope you love these healthy trail mix cookies as much as we do!

A stack of cookies sits in front of a plate of more cookies.
A stack of trail mix cookies shows the top one with a bite taken out. There are more cookies in the background.

Trail Mix Cookies

These trail mix cookies taste like a mixture of your favorite granola with oatmeal chocolate chip cookies. If you love soft, buttery cookies, these will be your favorite!
5 from 1 vote
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 12 minutes
Resting Time: 5 minutes
Total Time: 22 minutes
Servings: 36 cookies
Calories: 145kcal

Ingredients

  • 2 flax eggs
  • 3 cups old-fashioned oats
  • 1 cup vegan butter
  • 1 cup brown sugar packed
  • ¼ cup granulated sugar
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 tablespoons molasses
  • 1 ¾ cups all-purpose flour (plus 1 tablespoon)
  • 1 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • 1 cup trail mix (I used Power Up Omega-3 Trail Mix)
  • 1 cup dairy-free chocolate chips dairy-free

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 325°F/165°C. Line cookie sheets parchment paper. 
  • Make the flax egg and set it aside.
  • Measure the oats and then spread them out across one of the baking sheets and bake in the heated oven for 10 minutes. Stir the oats one time during baking. Set aside to cool completely.
  • Place the butter in a mixing bowl. Use either a handheld or stand mixer on medium speed and beat until light and fluffy. Add the sugars and beat again until light and fluffy. Add the flax eggs, vanilla, and molasses and beat again to combine.
  • In a separate bowl, combine the flour (1 ¾ cup + 1 tablespoon), baking soda, baking powder, cinnamon, and salt. Stir to combine. Pour the flour mixture with the butter mixture and mix at low speed until combined. Add the cooled oats and beat on low speed until combined.
  • Stir in the trail mix and chocolate chips, reserving some of both to press into the tops of the cookie dough balls. Chill the dough for 10 to 15 minutes.
  • Increase the oven temperature to 350°F/175°C.
  • Use a cookie dough scoop to scoop out dough and drop them 2 inches apart on a prepared baking sheet (add some chocolate chips to the top of each cookie ball). Bake 10 to 12 minutes depending on your desired texture. They will firm up as they cool so it's better to pull them out while still a little soft in the middle.
  • Remove from oven and allow to cool for a minute before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.
  • Store cookies in an airtight container for up to 5 days at room temperature. They will keep in the fridge for up to 10 days or in the freezer for up to 2 months.

Recommended Equipment

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Notes

Make these cookies gluten-free by using gluten-free baking flour.
Make-ahead Tips: You can refrigerate the prepared dough by covering it in plastic wrap, so it is touching the surface of the dough, then adding foil over the top of the bowl. Refrigerate it for 1 to 2 days. For more make-ahead ideas, here are more tips on freezing cookie dough.
Nutrition Facts
Trail Mix Cookies
Amount Per Serving
Calories 145 Calories from Fat 54
% Daily Value*
Fat 6g9%
Saturated Fat 3g15%
Trans Fat 1g
Cholesterol 1mg0%
Sodium 111mg5%
Potassium 97mg3%
Carbohydrates 20g7%
Fiber 1g4%
Sugar 10g11%
Protein 2g4%
Vitamin A 240IU5%
Vitamin C 1mg1%
Calcium 33mg3%
Iron 1mg6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

The nutrition information shown is an estimate provided by an online nutrition calculator and should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.

This post was originally published in 2012 and was updated to include new photos, new text, and an updated recipe in 2021.

9 Responses to Trail Mix Cookies

  1. Avatar thumbnail image for MarlyShannon Reply

    I have been mixing so many things in my chocolate chip cookies lately. It makes them even better, if that’s even possible.

  2. Avatar thumbnail image for MarlyCassie Reply

    These look amazing, Marla. I love all of the little additions, like chai seeds…perfect!

  3. Avatar thumbnail image for Marlyliz@carpeseason Reply

    Would love to take a big container of these camping! They look fantastic..also LOVE your rundown on how the cookie got its name. Reminds me of Bill Bryson’s Made in America: An Informal History of the English language. Hilarious! At least to a language nerd like me.

  4. Avatar thumbnail image for MarlyEvan Thomas Reply

    Great sounding cookies! I love hemp seeds. They remind me of a vanilla almond.

  5. Avatar thumbnail image for MarlyHeidi @ Food Doodles Reply

    These look delicious no matter what you call them 😀 I love all the names, haha. I love all the different seeds in your cookies, and they look great!

  6. Avatar thumbnail image for MarlyGrace Reply

    mmm….yummy! I love all the cool names especially “kinkawoodles”. Your pics are amazing Marly again you have me drooling, why do you live so far away! I can’t stop in for coffee and kinkawoodles.

  7. Avatar thumbnail image for MarlyJessie Reply

    I just made these and they were amazing! Although, I cannot officially call them trailmix cookies because I didn’t have any of the seeds on hand so I really just made chocolate chip cookies. I also didn’t have enough brown sugar so I made up for it with agave (which I considered using anyways because the peanut butter was so chunky) and I used arrowroot instead of cornstarch and they turned out sooooo good! Next time I’m at the store I will surely grab the seeds and make these again and again. This is now my favorite chocolate chip cookie recipe! Especially since I almost always have all of these ingredients on hand (except the seeds of course). Oh yeah, I used almond milk because I never have soy.

    Thanks for the recipe!

  8. Avatar thumbnail image for MarlyNina Reply

    Hello, lovely looking biscuits. I’m pretty keen to make anything and everything more healthy, especially for my children.
    I wish I could get hemp seeds here in Oz but clearly our government hasn’t quite grasped the abundance of good hemp seeds can do for the body. Never fear, I’ll use chopped sunflower seeds instead. 🙂
    I am interested to know how many biscuits you made from this mix?
    Cheers, Nina
    p.s. What you call biscuits (fairly flat, dense, bread like. You put jam on them), we (Australia, the UK, possibly elsewhere) call scones. Aaah, language. Don’t you love it? 😉

  9. Avatar thumbnail image for MarlyHealthy Meals for Less Reply

    These look great. I’ll definitely have to try these. I’m a sucker for cookies 🙂

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