Vegan Meringue (How to Make it Three Ways)

Learn How to Make Vegan Meringue Three Ways! This Aquafaba Meringue creates a fluffy, smooth egg free meringue you’ll love! Meringue is typically an egg-based creation, who knew it could be vegan simply by using chickpea water! You’ll be surprised with the simple list of ingredients involved to add vegan meringue to your favorite pies, brownies, and even more desserts!

A mixer beater shows meringue dripping off the edge. The text, "How to Make Vegan Meringue 3 ways" is at the top.

Vegans have essentially gone from feeling like meringue was extinct to a bountiful supply overnight. Yes, that means vegan meringue pie is now a possibility!

Mostly this is thanks to a can of chickpeas. I know, I know. Who’d have thunk it! But, interestingly enough, you can do a lot with a can of chickpeas.

I’ve done everything from making Vegan Cheesecake with chickpeas to Blondie Bites to, of course, hummus. But those recipes call for working with the beans from the can. Today we’ll be using something a else that comes from that can of chickpeas.

A pie has a slice cut out, showing chocolate pudding a meringue on top.

How to Make Vegan Meringue Without Eggs

Today I’m sharing three ways to make vegan meringues. Let’s start with that can of chickpeas, except we’re not going to be using the beans themselves.

Version 1: Vegan Meringue with Chickpea Water (AquaFaba Meringue)

I don’t know how the name AquaFaba came into being, but I mostly just refer to the liquid from a can of beans as chickpea brine. Vegan Aquafaba meringues are interesting, because it gets big and fluffy just like an egg-based meringue. That’s because chickpea water basically resembles the structure and consistency of egg whites.

And since egg whites are a key ingredient in meringue, some brilliant person realized that rather than throwing the chickpea juice out, we could be using it. And now we are.

These are basically the ingredients you’ll need to make this aquafaba meringue recipe — a can of chickpeas, cream of tartar, sugar, and some clear vanilla. Not too shabby!

Looking down on ingredients to make vegan meringue, including a can of chickpeas, and sugar in a bowl.

So, how to make chickpea meringue. Simply drain the liquid from one can of chickpeas (you can also use great northern beans but chickpeas are my favorite) into a mixing bowl. Add half of a teaspoon of cream of tartar and mix it for a minute or so to get a nice frothy mixture.

Next, let’s talk about how to whip aquafaba.

Looking down on a stand mixer with a foamy chickpea liquid mixture in the bottom.

While the aquafaba recipe and the cream of tartar are mixing, place the sugar in a food processor and pulse for up to a minute to make a more fine sugar. If you want to skip this step you can always purchase caster sugar at the store.

Once the sugar is ready, add it one tablespoon at a time into the chickpea brine mixture. Continue beating.

Looking down on a stand mixer and a hand is about to add a teaspoon of fine sugar.

Once all the sugar is added, continue beating on medium speed. Here’s what the garbanzo bean liquid meringue looks like after two minutes of beating.

Looking down on a stand mixer and the mixture in the bottom is turning white. A phone next to the mixer indicate it's been beating for 2 minutes.

Here’s what the chickpea meringue recipe looks like after 5 minutes of beating. Not too exciting…yet!

Looking down on a stand mixer and the mixture is starting to fill the bowl a little more. The phone next to the mixer indicates it's been beating for 5 minutes.

Here’s what it looks like after 7 minutes of beating. You can’t see it from this angle, but there are some peaks forming below that mixer!

Looking down on a stand mixer and the ingredients in the bowl are starting to stick to the beaters. The timer on the phone next to the mixer indicates it's been beating for 7 minutes.

I like to rub a little of the meringue between my fingers. Do I feel any grit? If so, I’ll beat for another minute or so to get a nice, smooth consistency.

Looking down on a stand mixer with white frothy, ingredients in the bowl. A hand has some of the ingredients and is pinching it.

This vegan meringue is ready for a pie! Simply spread this over your favorite pie, making sure to create a seal with each edge of the crust, and bake at 350F for about 20 minutes. If you don’t have browned meringue peaks, then turn the heat up to 375F and bake for another 5-10 minutes. Remove from the oven and cool on a rack for about an hour and then refrigerate.

A stand mixer has been pulled back and the vegan meringue is thickly falling from the beaters.

Make sure you give your family about 3 billion guesses what you used instead of egg whites!

Also, this version of meringue may result in liquid forming at the bottom of the pie after you cut it. I drained that liquid and everything was just fine. The meringue will come out of the oven nice and high, but will most likely settle after being refrigerated. Don’t worry, it will still taste great!

Version #2: How to Make Vegan Meringue with Egg Replacer

If you can’t bring yourself to work with garbanzo bean water meringue, I understand. You need another option. And you’re in luck, because I’ve got one for you.

This version of how to make Vegan Meringue uses Ener-G’s Egg Replacer product. I use this product in some of my baking, and it turns out it makes a decent meringue too.

Looking down on some ingredients in measuring cups, like sugar, and water.

Using these ingredients, and the recipe below, you can make a beautiful vegan meringue. That’s why this recipe for How to Make Vegan Meringue is so helpful!

A pie topped with vegan meringue is in a pie dish. A lemon is behind it.

Here’s the Egg Replacer Meringue on top of our Lemon Pie. It’s pretty amazing stuff! Personally, I prefer the bean brine version of meringue, but this one has a more subtle flavor. You know, if subtle is your thing.

Version 3: Either of the Above with Xanthan Gum

I tried both of the recipes above with and without and found both were better with the addition of Xanthan Gum. Here’s the deal, you only need half a teaspoon of this stuff and it adds structure to your vegan meringue. It will take your vegan meringue from pretty to mucho fabulouso in a second!

The bean brine Vegan Meringue is my favorite and it did quite well and looked amazing right out of the oven, but had a tendency to deflate overnight in the fridge. The bean bring Vegan Meringue with just a half teaspoon of Xanthan Gum formed nice, stiff peaks that held their form for days.

Some people don’t like to use Xanthan Gum because it is a manufactured product. I get that. If you’re interested in learning more about xanthan gum and all the technical jargon that goes along with it, click the link above for the wiki page and decide for yourself.

A lemon meringue pie has a slice cut out, showcasing layers of lemon curd and meringue on top.

Is Cream of Tartar Vegan?

Cream of tartar is made from the residue left on barrels of wine. It’s an acid and is used as a leavener to create a chemical reaction in food, for example when it’s combined with baking soda. There is no dairy in cream of tartar so it’s perfectly fine for vegans to consume.

The most beautiful pie in the word - Vegan Chocolate Meringue Pie

What Can I Make with Aquafaba Meringue?

There’s a variety of recipes you can use this vegan aquafaba meringue on, including the following:

Making Vegan Coconut Meringue Pie

I hope you love this recipe as we do! Have you tried it? Be sure and leave a comment and a rating of this recipe below and then take a quick photo and share it with me using #namelymarly on Instagram. I love seeing your creations!

The most beautiful pie in the word - Vegan Chocolate Meringue Pie

Vegan Meringue with Chickpea Brine

Fluffy, smooth meringue. Typically an egg-based creation, who knew it could be vegan! Learn How to Make Vegan Meringue Three Ways. You’ll be surprised with the simple list of ingredients involved to add vegan meringue to your favorite pies, brownies, and even more desserts!
5 from 11 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: French
Keyword: Vegan Meringue
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 25 minutes
Total Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 8 servings or 1 pie
Calories: 49kcal
Author: Namely Marly

Ingredients

  • ¾ cup bean brine liquid from one can of chickpeas
  • ½ teaspoon cream of tartar
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla
  • Optional: ½ teaspoon xantham gum

Instructions

  • Pour the liquid from one can of chickpeas (salted or unsalteinto a mixing bowl, along with the cream of tartar. Mix for a minute or two until the mixture begins to become frothy.
  • In the meantime place the sugar in a food processor and pulse for up to a minute to create a more fine sugar (you can always purchase caster sugar if you want to skip this step).
  • While you are mixing the chickpea brine, add one tablespoon of the processed sugar at a time. Once it’s all added, continue to mix on medium to medium-high speed until soft peaks form. Add the vanilla and continue mixing until stiff peaks form.
  • Optional: Add the xanthan gum to help the meringue form and maintain stiff peaks.
  • Spoon the finished meringue over the pie of your choice, making sure to create a seal with the pie crust and creating a peak of meringue in the middle. The more edges you have in the meringue, the more that will brown, creating a beautiful pie.
Nutrition Facts
Vegan Meringue with Chickpea Brine
Amount Per Serving
Calories 49
% Daily Value*
Potassium 30mg1%
Carbohydrates 12g4%
Sugar 12g13%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

The nutrition information shown is an estimate provided by an online nutrition calculator and should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.

How to Make Vegan Meringue

Vegan Meringue with Egg Replacer

Create a beautiful and tall vegan meringue using egg replacer.
5 from 11 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: French
Keyword: Vegan Meringue with Egg Replacer
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 25 minutes
Servings: 8 servings or 1 pie
Calories: 94kcal
Author: Namely Marly

Ingredients

  • ½ cup Egg Replacer
  • 2/3 cup water
  • ¼ cup granulated sugar
  • ½ teaspoon vanilla
  • Optional: ½ teaspoon xanthan gum

Instructions

  • Combine the Egg Replacer and water in a mixing bowl and begin mixing on medium speed.
  • In the meantime place your sugar in a food processor and pulse up to a minute (or you can buy fine, caster sugar).
  • Pour the refined sugar one tablespoon at a time into the Egg Replacer mixture. Continue beating, pausing to wipe down the sides of the bowl as needed.
  • Once soft peaks have formed, add the vanilla. Mix until stiff peaks form.
  • Optional: Add xanthan gum to create a more stable meringue that will hold stiff peaks even after baking.
  • Spoon the finished meringue over your pie, being sure to seal the meringue up to the edges of the pie crust. Create decorate tips in the meringue that will turn golden upon baking.
  • Place in an oven heated to 350F and bake for 15-20 minutes. Turn heat up to 375F and bake for an additional 10 minutes or so until peaks turn golden brown.

Notes

*I used Ener-G egg replacer and it’s the only commercial egg replacer that I think works in this recipe. You can find it at the health food section of most grocery stores here in the Midwest. You can also buy it online or at health food stores.
Nutrition Facts
Vegan Meringue with Egg Replacer
Amount Per Serving
Calories 94 Calories from Fat 18
% Daily Value*
Fat 2g3%
Cholesterol 89mg30%
Sodium 126mg5%
Potassium 116mg3%
Carbohydrates 9g3%
Sugar 9g10%
Protein 8g16%
Vitamin A 195IU4%
Vitamin C 0.2mg0%
Calcium 51mg5%
Iron 0.5mg3%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

The nutrition information shown is an estimate provided by an online nutrition calculator and should not be considered a substitute for a professional nutritionist’s advice.

We hope you love these tips on how to make vegan meringue. We certainly enjoyed making the pies (and eating them too).

Enjoy!

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28 Responses to Vegan Meringue (How to Make it Three Ways)

    • Please let me know how it goes! I was a little timid the first time I tried it and after working with it awhile now, am loving it. I CANNOT wait to bring a vegan meringue pie to my family dinner. I don’t plan to tell anyone how I made the meringue until AFTER they’ve tried it. Is that bad? It probably is, but I can’t help myself! 🙂

  1. Back in my non-vegan days I used to love meringue, and I’ve seen these aqua faba recipes around the internet and am very intrigued! Next time I do up a lemon pie I’m trying this. 🙂

    • Stay tuned Allysia, because I have some more vegan meringue pies coming right up! My favorite has been the chocolate. No wait. I really loved the coconut. Oh, I guess I love ’em all! I hope you try it too. Send me a pic with #veganpieweek – I’d love to see how it turns out for you!

    • Hi Aleen! I haven’t tried using water from my home-cooked chickpeas yet. However, if I were to do that, I would definitely cook the liquid down until it was nice and thick. In other words, if you start with a cup or a cup and a half of water left over from cooking your chickpeas, I would simmer that until it was down to around 3/4 of a cup. If you try it, let me know how it turns out!

    • Hi Mark. You raise a good point. When I first published this recipe, Ener-G was about the only egg replacer we had available. And that’s what I used for this recipe. Now there are many other egg replacer products available. I will edit the recipe to make note of this. Thanks!

  2. I used the bean brine, it works amazing, maybe you have to use the specific egg replacer mentioned (brand). Regardless, skip it, it’s frustrating and tastes gross, use the bean bribe, it’s amazing.

    • So glad this worked for you. I love the bean brine meringue. And so many fun options to use it with!

    • Hi Maggie! I’ve actually used Truvia when making this recipe and it worked just fine! I think there’s enough similarities between stevia and Truvia that it should work. Let me know how it goes!

    • Hey Lilly! Thanks so much for the feedback. So glad you loved this recipe! It’s kinda fun having meringue every now and then! ❤️

    • Hi Catalina. We don’t have Orgran here, but I looked at the ingredients. It looks very similar to Ener-g so I think it would make a very similar meringue to that. Try following my instructions for the Ener-g meringue. Let me know how it goes!

  3. I have boiled 500g dried chickpeas in a LOT of water. After they were a bit overdone, I removed the chickpeas and let the water simmer for a few minutes more. After the aqua faba cooled down, I poured it into ice cube trays (my favorite silicone hexagonal ones) and when the ice cubes were frozen solid, I transferred them into a freezer bag. Now I have home made aqua faba whenever I want. In the exact quantity needed.

  4. The name AquaFaba came about because it is not just chickpea water, it is water of any legume (and yes, all can be whipped!! I used whipped split pea water as an egg substitute in homemade pasta) and legumes belong to the family FABACEAE (because they are so FABulous 😉 )

    • Hi Emma. Thanks for your perspective on this! I believe we share a love of the whipped bean juice! I haven’t seen other legume waters being referred to as aquafaba but have myself used them to make whipped meringues. I have used this America’s Test Kitchen article on Aquafaba as a resource. Also, I think I want to make Fabaceae my new favorite word! Love it! ❤️

  5. I just made the AquaFaba version and I worked perfectly!
    I made a vegan Lemon pie and I burnt the merengue with a torch, It looks really nice.
    Thanks for the recipe ❤️

    • Thanks, Karen! So glad you liked the vegan meringue for the lemon pie. I agree with you — the fullness of the meringue is so surprising…and tasty too!

  6. I loved how the bean liquid whipped. Up per your great instruction. However I baked them at 400 degress and when opened the oven for to check….there nothing! Except a film on the parchment paper. It was good for a belly laugh. Not for our bellies though. So follow heating instructions too!

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